Five Years After Snowden, Michigan Set to Be First State to Impede NSA’s Warrantless Surveillance

Warrantless surveillance, surveillance, privacy, Snowden, NSA …Warrantless surveillance

-by Whitney Webb

In less than a month, a Michigan state law will take effect and ban any state or local government from aiding the government agency’s controversial program that gathers data on Americans in violation of the Fourth Amendment.

On the heels of the fifth anniversary of whistleblower Edward Snowden’s disclosure of classified National Security Agency (NSA) documents to journalists, one state legislature has recently taken steps to hold the government agency accountable for its warrantless surveillance programs by making it illegal for state and local governments, including law enforcement and public utilities, to support the NSA’s warrantless spying on American citizens.

According to Michigan’s Fourth Amendment Rights Protection Act, also known as Public Act 71 of 2018, state and local governments can only assist or provide support to the federal government’s collection of data if there is a search warrant or the informed consent of the targeted party. The bill is set to take effect in just a few weeks on June 17th, 2018.

While the NSA has no publicly disclosed facility in the state, the bill’s proponents have asserted that it sends a clear message to the federal government regarding the lack of popularity for its warrantless wiretapping of millions of Americans in violation of the legal protections granted to them by the Constitution.

“It hangs up a sign on Michigan’s door saying, ‘No violation of the Fourth Amendment, look elsewhere’,” said Republican state Rep. Martin Howrylak, the bill’s author, according to the Washington Examiner. “Democrats as well as Republicans would certainly stand very strong in our position on what this law means.”

“This new law guarantees no state resources will be used to help the federal government execute mass warrantless surveillance programs that violate the Fourth Amendment protections enshrined in the U.S. Constitution,” Howrylak said soon after the bill was first passed earlier this year in March.

“Michigan will not assist the federal government with any data collection unless it is consistent with the constitution,” he added.

The Michigan law seeking to condemn the NSA’s most controversial program is not the first of its kind. However, it is the first to have been passed successfully without having been  subsequently watered down. For instance, in 2014, state lawmakers in Maryland sought to shut off power and water to NSA headquarters but many of its sponsors dropped their support of the bill after a powerful political backlash. A similar bill was floated in Utah’s state legislature at the same time, but went nowhere after it was rejected by the state’s governor.

The only state to have passed a bill similar to Michigan’s is California, which passed the Fourth Amendment Protection Act in 2014. However, that piece of legislation protects the Fourth Amendment in name only as it bans local assistance “in response to a request from a federal agency” and “if the state has actual knowledge that the request constitutes an illegal or unconstitutional collection.”

Despite the efforts being made by state legislatures to restore the Fourth Amendment, such efforts have been largely absent at the national level in recent years. Earlier this year, in January, Congress voted to extend the government’s warrantless surveillance of American citizens for another six years. However, Congress’ reauthorization of the program was more than a mere extension of the program as it actually helped expand the NSA’s authority by codifying some of the more controversial aspects of the program, suggesting that interest in protecting and restoring the Constitution is largely found at the state and local levels of government.

About the author:

Whitney Webb is a staff writer for MintPress News and a contributor to Ben Swann’s Truth in Media. Her work has appeared on ZeroHedge, the AntiMedia, Newsbud and 21st Century Wire, among others. She has also made radio and TV appearances on RT and Sputnik. She currently lives with her family in southern Chile.

Follow Whitney Webb on Twitter.

 

Tags:

Fourth amendment, warrantless surveillance, surveillance, privacy, Snowden, state, local governments, NSA

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China’s Smart City Plan To Boost Surveillance

Smart city…

Beijing China, mass surveillance, new paradigm, technology, technocracy, smart city

-by Katrina Yu

Smart cities will collect and centralise data on everything from transport and waste management, to pollution and crime. The government says it will improve urban planning and boost the economy, but critics say it’s about tightening control.

In the west of Beijing there’s a convenience store which isn’t run by staff, but by artificially intelligent digital technology.

The ‘Eatbox’ shop is located in a busy shopping centre and is no bigger than a shipping crate.

First-time customers use their phone to scan a barcode by the entrance, then upload a selfie to the stores database. In less than a minute the customer’s face is registered online, and they may enter by standing in front of the entrance.

A facial recognition system unlocks the door, allowing the customer to enter.

Chosen goods are then scanned and paid for by mobile phone. If a customer fails to pay the exit door will refuse to open… see more